Wednesday Writers to Read: Global Edition

Yesterday, our intrepid Advisory Editor Jim Rogers sent me an article on the Irish essayist Tim Robinson (I’ve written before on how much I adore Robinson), in which Robinson moves into the “third half” of his life, beyond the writing of Aran and Connemara that has consumed and fueled his life for the last several decades.

It is as if, as he approaches his 80th year, Robinson is drawn from the micro- to the macroscopic at a time when most of his peers might be moving in the opposite direction. “My work before was a study of the individual’s relationship to the landscape,” he says. “Now I really want to write about the material individual’s relationship to the rest of the universe, so I am beginning to do this, not systematically but almost following an arbitrary initial set of words.”

I’m trying to be (mentally) supportive, even as everything inside me is freezing at the thought of losing the Robinson work that is so vital to nonfiction, to Irish nonfiction, and beyond. Very few Irish nonfictionists are writing essays. There’s something in the water that leads to memoir, rather than other forms of nonfiction–which fascinates me on many levels.

This article is particularly timely, given the next stage of our In the Classroom initiative. The syllabi bank is growing nicely and it’s giving me the dual reaction of wanting to take all these classes as well as teach them. I’m really enjoying seeing how different people at different types of institutions teach similar classes, different texts. Love it. We launched our weekly blog series on “My Favorite Essay To Teach” and Sarah Einstein’s contribution on Amy Monticello’s “Playing the Odds” was a great way to start.

The next stage is to work on a database list of global nonfictionists. Who is writing nonfiction, outside of the United States? Who should we be reading? Who should we be teaching? Your suggestions do not have to be writing in English; they can be writing in any subgenre of nonfiction. Comment on this post, reply to us on Twitter, comment on Facebook with the name of the writer, country of origin, titles of the books or individual pieces, and a publication date. Multiple entries for a writer’s many works are most welcome. I can’t wait to see how this list grows!

-Karen

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